Category: Innovation

07
Jan

Titan Robotics Unveils the Cronus at CES 2017

Titan Robotics, a leading manufacturer of industrial 3D printers, introduces the next generation of 3D printing hardware, the Cronus, a multi-gantry 3D printer that uses five print heads working together on a single part. Titan Robotics began building the first commercial multi-head machine using Autodesk’s Project Escher technology in 2016. The technology that originally came from Project Escher intelligently distributes tool paths between multiple print heads working in unison on a single printer and is now a part of the company’s additive manufacturing software, Autodesk® Netfabb®.

Cronus

Titan Robotics will officially unveil the Cronus at this year’s Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas, January 5 – 9, 2017 (Booth 42441) where show attendees will be able to see the breakthrough technology in action. Combined with Autodesk Netfabb’s collaborative multi-head 3D printing technology, the Cronus provides a groundbreaking new solution for the additive manufacturing industry, allowing users to 3D print industrial scale parts at higher speeds and with greater detail than with traditional single-head 3D printing.

“It’s really exciting to upend what has been traditionally been regarded as a desktop prototyping technology and show that it’s a powerful way to make large parts – such as molds and fixtures – out of high performance materials,” said Andreas Bastian, Principal Research Scientist at Autodesk.

Ball screws and servo motors

Titan Robotics uses its proven concepts and technology to minimize any compromise to detail or accuracy when printing large, complex parts on the Cronus. When printing on a large scale, Titan Robotics knows precision, rigidity and durability of the machine are crucial to ensure a successful print. That is why the foundation of the Cronus is a welded steel, precision machined frame fitted with the highest quality components, such as 16mm ballscrews, profiled linear rails and Yaskawa servo motors.

“At Titan Robotics, we know what it takes to make a truly industrial large-format 3D printer,” said Titan Robotics Founder and CEO, Clay Guillory. “This collaborative control technology is going to change everything we know about 3D printing and CNC manufacturing.”

A versatile design allows the Cronus to be fitted with various types of tool heads for subtractive and additive manufacturing, including pellet extruders to allow for extremely fast fabrication of large parts at 5 lbs/hour per print head.

The Cronus has a standard build volume of 72x30x20 inches, but can be customized to a customer’s needs. While open air printing is possible for PLA and PETG, the Cronus is also available with a fully heated enclosure to allow for use with higher temperature plastics such as ABS, PC+PBT and other polycarbonate blends.

“Machines running collaborative multi-head 3D printing technology require a higher level of precision than is typical of large format deposition systems. This is why we’re excited to use the Cronus as an ongoing development platform,” said Bastian of the Cronus.

The Cronus will be available for commercial sale February 2017, for more information email info@titan3drobotics.com.

Multi-gantry design

 About Titan Robotics

Titan Robotics is a leader in manufacturing large-format, custom 3D printers that are built to lasT. Founded by mechanical engineer Clay Guillory in 2014, Titan fabricates every 3D printer using the highest quality components and precision machined American-made steel at its facility in Colorado Springs, Co. Titan’s flagship industrial 3D printer, the Atlas, is one of the largest FFF 3D printers on the market, with build volumes up to 42x42x48 inches, and can reliably print in high temperature plastics thanks to an industrial heated enclosure. More at www.Titan3DRobotics.com

21
Oct

Sharing 3D Printing with the Community

While 3D printing has been around for quite some time, and has become more popular in the last few years, there are still many in the community who aren’t familiar with the technology and its practical applications.  Part of what we do here at Titan Robotics is expose new people to the disruptive technology of 3D printing and how it will be a game changer for so many industries.

Founder and CEO Clay Guillory speaking at TEDx Arena Circle

Founder and CEO Clay Guillory speaking at TEDx Arena Circle

Recently, founder and CEO Clay Guillory spoke to a group of several hundred people at the TEDx event at the University of Northern Colorado. His TEDx Talk was not only his story of getting involved in the 3D printing community, but what is next for the industry. Clay shared his experiences with the non-profit E-Nabling the Future by 3D printing prosthetic hands for children with missing limbs. Clay says that experience of helping others made him realize that 3D printing was his future and inspired him to build a career out of it.

TEDx Arena Circle 2016 Speakers

TEDx Arena Circle 2016 Speakers

The TEDx event allowed Titan Robotics to share with people how 3D printing isn’t just being used to make novelty items or small parts. Clay talked about Titan’s goals of using large-format 3D printing to design and fabricate full size prosthetics and adaptive devices, and how by improving speed and scale industries can manufacture parts at a much more affordable rate.

UCCS College of Business Forum at Titan Robotics

UCCS College of Business Forum at Titan Robotics

Titan Robotics also welcomed 40 students and their mentors from the University of Colorado Colorado Springs College of Business this Friday as part of their Career Coaching Program.  Students, mentors and faculty had the chance to tour Titan’s new facility and get an up close look at the manufacturing process.

It was a chance for community leaders and the next members of the work force to see how a start-up manufacturing company operates on a daily basis. From starting the company in his garage, to hiring on a full-time staff, Clay shared his story of being a young entrepreneur. Not to mention everyone enjoyed seeing all of the large 3D printers in action and the unique parts they create.

UCCS College of Business Students Tour at Titan Robotics

UCCS College of Business Students Tour at Titan Robotics

The Titan staff enjoyed hosting tours and a Q&A session with the UCCS group. Students and mentors asked great questions about the company and Titan’s business model, as well as how 3D printing will change manufacturing.

UCCS College of Business Tour at Titan Robotics

UCCS College of Business Tour at Titan Robotics

As an innovative company, Titan Robotics wants to expand its outreach beyond potential customers. Titan is an active member in the 3D printing community, from contributing new ideas to getting involved with people and organizations on a local level.

We believe it’s important to open up our doors and share what we’re doing with large-format 3D printers. It helps the 3D printing industry expand and inspires people to come up with new innovative ways to utilize large-format 3D printing.

07
Oct

Pellet Extrusion 3D Printing on the Atlas

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Pellet extrusion system mounted on the Atlas

In the age of large scale FDM 3D printing, there are a number of limitations with typical filament extrusion systems. By incorporating an extrusion system that extrudes directly from plastic resin instead of filament, a number of these limitations can be avoided. 3D printing with plastic pellets has several benefits which include faster print times and lower cost. Titan Robotics recently partnered with Push Plastic to design and build a pellet extruder that fits on Titan’s flag ship large-format 3D printer, the Atlas. (See video below)Push Plastic logo

 

By eliminating part of the manufacturing process, the price to print parts can be much more affordable.

Instead of melting down plastic pellets and extruding it into filament, the pellets are melted and extruded directly onto the 3D printer bed. Consider this, 1kg of filament can cost anywhere from $20 to $30, but the same amount of plastic in pellet form costs $2 to $5 and are widely available.

Another advantage is speed. Speed can be a limiting factor when 3D printing large objects. When strength and speed of production are of utmost importance, pellet 3D printing is the best solution. Pellet extrusion can push plastic three times faster than high volume filament extrusion. At Titan Robotics, we’ve achieved flow rates of 5 lbs per hour with a 3mm nozzle and feed rates of 7,000 mm a minute with 1 mm nozzle. With further modifications, we hope to increase the flow rate up to six or seven pounds per hour. Compared to filament extrusion, you’d be lucky to reach a flow rate of 7 lbs over an entire day.

Titan Robotics is also pushing the envelope of pellet 3D printing by using a heated enclosure with the extrusion system.

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Flow rate of 5 lbs per hour

Most pellet extrusion systems are open air which limits them to materials that do not warp or that are highly filled with carbon fiber. Titans pellet extruder will be able to print with high temp plastics such as unfilled ABS, and Polycarbonate resin. So far, open air test prints with PLA and HIPS resin proved to be extremely successful. Titan is currently working on optimizing printing in an enclosure with ABS and Polycarbonate.

So how did Titan do it? Thanks to Push Plastic, Titan was able to swap out a traditional filament extruder with the pellet extruder directly onto the Atlas.

Because the Atlas is a robustly designed machine, no other auxiliary equipment was needed to adapt the system for pellet extrusion.

This type of affordable pellet extrusion 3D printing is groundbreaking in the 3D printing industry. This 3D printing method is ideal for those looking to combine additive and subtractive manufacturing, where a part is quickly printed using a pellet extruder and then finished with a CNC machine.

For more information about the pellet extrusion system compatible with the Atlas, please contact us here.

13
Sep

Finding new partners in Foundry: Alliant Castings

We recently had the privilege of delivering and installing another fully enclosed Atlas 2.0 to a foundry in Minnesota, Alliant Castings. It’s a wonderful, family owned business that’s been around for decades and they’re looking to shake things up and by working with 3D printing to improve upon traditional foundry processes.

Alliant Castings estimates 3D printing will save half the cost and is three times faster than traditional pattern making processes.Continue Reading..

06
Sep

Titan Engineer Allison Jones Named Flag Bearer for Rio Paralympics

Allison flag bearerThe Titan Robotics team could not be more proud of our friend and colleague, Allison Jones, who has been selected as the Flag Bearer for Team U.S.A.  at the 2016 Rio Paralympic Games! This will be Allison’s eighth Paralympics and we could not think of a more deserving person for such an honor. The Opening Ceremony will air Wednesday, September 7, 2016, from 7:00pm to 10:00pm E.T. on NBCSN.Continue Reading..

16
Aug

Titan Robotics Engineers Help Paralympic Athletes Using 3D Printing

Titan Robotics is known for our industrial large-format 3D printers, but another arm of the business is helping others through 3D printing. 3D printing prosthetics for children and stability devices for athletes has proven to be revolutionary for people with a physical disability, especially athletes. Titan’s own Allison Jones, a mechanical engineer and Paralympic athlete, has a passion for using her skills as an engineer to develop new and innovative ways to use 3D printing to improve her own performance and the capabilities of others.Continue Reading..